A Modest Proposal – Part 3.6

BY DAN ROGERS - DIAMOND LAKE, WASHINGTON - USA

Dan’s plan

“Seems like, the last time I checked in, the Frankenbot in progress was gonna’ have a red top. And, the designated name was Mobius. But, then I mentioned it to SWMBO. Since then, there have been a couple rather large changes-of-paradigm.”

Alice and I went down to see what’s up at the beach. Not much happening this afternoon. But, hey, the first cruise of the year over here on the Dry Side (east coast of Washington) comes in less than 3 months. Fortunately, the county crews take care of this particular road. We were just being tourists. Believe me, I was some kinda’ COLD, out there today. I scuttled back to the shop, and got back to work, before The Boss discovered I was AWOL.




Seems like, the last time I checked in, the Frankenbot in progress was gonna’ have a red top. And, the designated name was Mobius. But, then I mentioned it to SWMBO. Since then, there have been a couple rather large changes-of-paradigm.

First off, I discovered that I have had too many red boats. What I really wanted was a green boat. And, not just any green. What I really wanted was a forest green. This would be the particular green, that I discovered I really wanted to paint the cabin top all along. At least I hope this is the one I really wanted. Because my friend, Dan, over at the hardware store mixed me up a fresh gallon of the stuff.

I of little faith, started with a quart. That made two coats for one side. At this rate, I should have plenty of green paint. When SWMBO dropped by on one of her quite-infrequent visits, to check on the newly desired colors, she mentioned that the boat was looking like a gypsy wagon. I of little spine, readily agreed.

That was when I discovered that I really didn’t like the name Mobius. Nope. Not a bit. What I really did like-shall I assume you’ve already beat me to the punch line, here? What I really like better, is Gypsy Wagon. So, Gypsy Wagon with the forest green lid will, hopefully, inch closer to launch and sea trials.

After the styro insulation was all in, I had a moment of hesitation. My plan all along has been to close the overhead in with narrow pine strips. It’s a process that I’ve used in several of the forebears. When I began cutting up the pine that I have been saving for this next phase, it had a whole lot more stress, twists, and warps than I figured on. Not the best circumstance when the stock all must be resawn and bull nosed and sanded, and expected to remain in place. Soooo, I took a bit of a short cut. The longest distance between two points.

I cut up a stack of birch-faced door skins and hung them up one frame-bay at a time.

Of course, I still needed trim stock to cover all the staples used to mount the birch ply panels. Same stock. Same process. Same short cut. Maybe a couple fewer climbings in and out. Anyhow, there’ still a modicum of pine strips needed to trim out the corners and bulkhead ends and such. But, further progress today was sort of limited.

The other reason I drove Alice down to the lake today was an effort to get her transmission warmed up. Seems her original equipment hydraulic system (1947) is prone to freezing up. The oil comes directly out of the main gearbox, and thru a simple power take-off pump. It goes through a 10 foot long hose to a single-action cylinder-no return line. While wrapping that 14 hp four-banger up to “full speed” (probably 15 mph) is kinda’ dramatic-not enough heat generated to get the snow blade lifting mechanism to work. And, we’ve got another dump of snow on the way. Soooooo, looks like I’ll have to rack up the remainder of the day to other-than- frankenbuilding. Here’s hoping for better luck tomorrow.

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