Construction and Design Journal – 14ft Dory for Rowing and Sailing – Part 3

by Roy Heberger - Boise, Idaho - USA

THE FRAMES – February 2004

When all of the frame views were developed it was time to start working with wood.   My trepidation was by no means minor at this point as it had been since August of 2002 that I’d any real experience in working with wood to build a boat.  But I’d done much reading, I’d reviewed my own Grand Banks Dory Manual written from my detailed notes taken at wooden boat school, and I’d gone through the many photographs taken during that short course.  With caution, I could do this!  Having purchased a new portable table saw for this project I selected pieces of RBC from my stash – estimating how much I would need for the six drawn frames only.  The RBC had tongues and grooves at all edges that had to be removed, so I set the saw up to rip those off the long edges and cross cut the ends.  Saw settings for the rips were 3 15/16″ for the tongues and 3 5/8″ for the grooves.  Cross cuts were done by eye (using a 90-degree brace on the saw) saving the maximum wood.




The trimmed RBC was all stacked and waiting a decision.  It was time to decide on the width dimensions of the frames – how wide would each futtock, rib and beam be?  After going back to pictures taken of the Grand Banks Dory and examining those frames, I decided to use 2 1/4″ as the standard width of these frames.  I would not taper the sheer board ribs, because the cabins would cover the gunwales except in the cockpit, and there the gunwales would be covered by decking and coaming.  There was no need to taper the ribs for appearance.

Top: Stem to Keelson and Transom to Keelson

Above: Knees Glued and Screwed and Small Plank Steamer

Building Jig Finished

After cutting all the RBC to the 2 1/4″ width I still had random lengths of wood to fit to the actual lengths needed for the futtocks, ribs, and beams.  So I began a sorting process by actually laying RBC stock down along the frame lines on the lofting board.  I was careful to fit short stock to short ribs until all I had was long stock left.  Then I fit the long stock to the longer futtocks and beams.  From there I began to cross cut stock to match the lengths needed for any remaining portions of frames until I had all the frame lines covered with stock.  All the individual pieces were labeled clearly as to station number, starboard or port, sheer board, garboard, cabin side, cabin top (beam), or bottom and up and down directions (using arrows).  All the pieces for a station were then picked up and placed into a paper sack until the lofting board was again clear.

Table 1.  Offsets for hull, 13-ft. LOA, self-righting dory.

Heights above Baseline Half-breadths from Centerline
 

Hull

 

Bottom

 

Knuckle

 

Sheer

 

Bottom

 

Knuckle

 

Sheer

 

Stem

 

0  1  7

 

1  9  1

 

2  6  0

 

0  0  6

 

0  0  6

 

0  0  6

 

Sta. 1

 

0  1  7

 

1  4  1.5

 

2  0  7

 

0  0  6

 

0  11  5.5

 

1  3  3

 

Sta. 2a

 

0  1  2

 

1  0  5

 

1  11  0

 

0  5  5.5

 

1  5  1.5

 

1  8  3.5

 

Sta. 2b

 

0  1  2

 

1  1  0.5

 

1  11  0.5

 

0  5  6.5

 

1  5  2.5

 

1  8  4.5

 

Sta. 2c

 

0  1  1.8

 

1  1  3.5

 

1  11  0

 

0  6  1

 

1  5  5

 

1  8  7

 

Sta. 3

 

0  0  6

 

0  10  5

 

1  9  2

 

0  11  3

 

1  11  3.5

 

2  2  3.5

 

Sta. 4

 

0  0  5.4

 

0  8  7.5

 

1  7  5

 

1  3  5.5

 

2  3  5.5

 

2  6  5.5

 

Sta. 5a

 

0  1  0

 

0  9  7

 

1  8  6

 

1  0  7

 

2  0  5

 

2  3  7

 

Sta. 5b

 

0  1  0

 

0  9  7.5

 

1  8  6.5

 

1  0  5

 

2  0  2

 

2  3  5.5

 

Sta. 5c

 

0  1  0

 

0  9  8.5

 

1  8  6.5

 

1  0  4.5

 

2  0  2

 

2  3  5

 

Sta. 6

 

0  1  4

 

0  11  5.5

 

1  9  6

 

0  5  4

 

1  5  0.5

 

1  9  6.5

 

Transom

 

0  2  0

 

1  2  4.5

 

2  0  0

 

0  0  3.5

 

0  3  5

 

0  6  0

 

Table 1 Notes: Stem offsets at bearding line.  Stations 1-5 offsets at aft edge of frames.  Stations 5, 6, and transom offsets at for edge of frames and inside of transom.  There will be a deck and combing along the sheers between the fore and aft cabins that will be built by eye and supported and braced below by knees fastened to the ribs at stations 2c, 3, 4, and 5a.

Table 2.  Offsets for cabins, 13-ft. LOA self-righting dory.

Heights above Baseline Half-breadths from Centerline
 

Cabins

 

Top

 

Sheer

 

Top

 

Sheer

 

Stem

 

2  10  2

 

2  6  0

 

0  0  6

 

0  0  6

 

Sta. 1

 

2  10  1.5

 

2  0  7

 

1  0  6

 

1  3  3

 

Sta. 2a

 

2  11  6.5

 

1  11 0

 

1  5  2

 

1  8  3.5

 

Sta. 2b

 

2  11  7

 

1  11  0.5

 

1  5  2.5

 

1  8  4.5

 

Sta. 2c

 

3  0  0

 

1  11  0

 

1  5  5

 

1  8  7

 

Aft Edge of

Fore CT

 

3  0  4.5

 

 

1  7  1

 

 

Fore edge of

Aft CT

 

3  0 3.5

 

 

1  11  1

 

 

Sta. 5a

 

3  0  1

 

1  8  6

 

1  10  6

 

2  3  7

 

Sta. 5b

 

3  0  0

 

1  8  6.5

 

1  10  4.5

 

2  3  5.5

 

Sta. 5c

 

2  11  7.5

 

1  8  6.5

 

1  10  4.5

 

2  3  5

 

Sta. 6

 

2  8  3.5

 

1  9  6

 

1  6  4

 

1  9  6.5

 

Transom

 

2  0  0

 

2  0  0

 

1  3  4

 

0  6  0

 

Table 2 Notes: There will be a combing from the cabin overhangs to the sheer that will be built by eye.

Table 3.  Length measurements from bearding line, 13-ft. LOA self-righting dory.

            Station Number or Name In                   Inches and fractions
 

Stem at Sheer (Bearding Line)

 

0

 

Stem at Knuckle

 

4  5/8

 

Station 1 and Stem at Bottom

 

24

 

Station 2b (Forward Bulkhead)

 

36

 

Aft Edge of Forecabin Top

 

42

 

Station 3

 

54  2/

 

Station 4

 

84

 

Fore Edge of Aft Cabin Top

 

105

 

Station 5b (Aft Bulkhead)

 

108

 

Station 6

 

125  15/16

 

Transom at Bottom

 

135

 

Transom at Knuckle

 

146  15/16

 

Transom at Bottom

 

156  15/16

 

1.  All distances are from bearding line of the stem at the sheer.

Because the RBC had been used for flooring, one side was finished.  To remove the finish I first

C-clamped my belt sander upside down to a workbench and turned it on.  The sander had a dust collector, but I knew from experience that it did not work very well, so I hooked up a shop vacuum to suck air in the vicinity of where most of the sanding dust was accumulating.  It helped some, but everything in the garage now has a layer of sanding dust.  Varnish removal using the belt sander took about three hours for all the RBC frame stock stock.

Part 1 – Part 2 – Part 3 – Part 4 – Part 5 – Part 6 – Part 7 – Part 8 – Part 9 – Part 10

Part 11 – Part 12 – Part 13 – Part 14 – Part 15 – Part 16 – Part 17 – Part 18 – Part 19

APPENDICES

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