APPENDICES

A brief word about the appendices included below is in order.  I did several other lines drawings before I developed concepts of the boat I was to build and actually designed this boat.  I have included two such concept sheets in Appendix 1.

Strange as it may seem I like to write songs for guitar and harmonica.  Several relate to boats and water.  They are included in Appendix 2.

In looking ahead during the project I developed sets of detailed lists of “to-dos.”  They are included in Appendix 3.

While I had been inspired to build a wooden boat for some time, an article from WoodenBoat (No. 176, January-February 2004) – A Boatload of Ambition by George Maynard –inspired me to design and build this boat.  The article details the construction of a transoceanic rowing dory built for Mick Bird by Jim Franklin and Kit Africa of Port Townsend, Washington.  This boat inspired my design, which is about half the length but proportionately much greater than half the beam of the original.  My boat is not designed to be self righting.  Based on pictures in the article, I’m not sure that worked out for the original either.  Ha!  The article that inspired my boat is included as Appendix 4.

I developed my thoughts and did lines drawings and sketches that were never scanned and filed on the computer.  Originals of most hand-written or hand drawn materials are included in Appendix 5 of the master journal and copies may be made if I elect to print additional copies.  I do not know why I would elect to do that, however.         

APPENDIX 1 – PRE-DESIGN CONCEPTS

CONCEPT SHEET AND DESCRIPTION – 11-FOOT, SELF-RIGHTING, EXPEDITION DORY (First Cut)

 Roy Heberger

 December 2003

 Having very recently read an article about a large, expedition dory designed for trans-oceanic rowing (January-February issue of WoodenBoat) and having contemplated building a sailing/rowing dory this winter, I am developing a summary of my thoughts about a small boat that I could use to explore the fresh waters and protected salt waters of the United States.  This is a Spartan, towable, beachable camping craft that I am envisioning.  Only a designed tarp would separate me from the elements as I sleep aboard at night.  During the day I could fashion shade.  Only my gear and supplies would be kept in dry stowage in cabins built forward and aft of an open cockpit.  So, here are my thoughts.  Oh, the boat would be capable of floating two people for day use.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The LOA is about 11 ft.; built with a multi-chine (2) Swampscott-type hull for rowing and sailing; beam greater than 5 ft.; self righting design with fore and aft dry stowage cabins.  For general use, boat camping, and extended expeditions on fresh water.

FEATURES

Hull — Plywood planking (two, 1/4th-inch minimum planks per side and one, 1/2-inch minimum “plywood-planked” bottom) with chine logs running through notched, oak frames (number yet to be determined) and two, 1/2-inch, water-tight, plywood and oak-framed, notched bulkheads.  All seams to be filleted with epoxy/wood-flour mixture.  Two parallel runners and a centered keel will be fastened to its outside bottom.  The keel will run from stem to transom, and the runners will be shorter.  On the inside of the bottom between the station frames and bulkheads additional, 1/4-inch plywood planking will be fastened for support above each of the runners and the keel.  External fiberglass?  Coat (brushwork) all wood with several applications of lacquer-thinned epoxy, but check for compatibility of epoxy and fiberglass resins first.  Be certain to coat the inner hull and inner cabin materials beforecabin construction!  Finish with paint inside and out.  Trim (gunwales, Y-support, cabin overhang trim, thwarts, etc.) will receive a bright finish.

Cabins — To minimize mass above the gunwales, plywood (1/4th inch) will be used in construction of the fore and aft dry-stowage cabins.  The forecabin measures about 3 ft.  along roof between the forward, watertight bulkhead and top of stem, and the aft cabin measures about 2 ft. along roofline between the aft, watertight bulkhead and top of transom.  Each cabin roof overhangs cockpit by about 6 inches.  The edges of the overhanging cabins will be framed with dimensional lumber.  Forecabin supports for the mast step will be of red-oak beams that run forward to stem and abeam to the cabin sides where they will join ribs that run to the gunwales, chines, and bottom.  Aft cabin supports for a vertically adjustable Y-fork (to hold boom at sea and mast when it is down) will be of dimensional lumber.  All seams to be filleted with epoxy/wood flour mixture.  The roof of the forecabin will be fitted with the green, light prism Merine gave to me.  The aft cabin will be dark.

Cockpit — Six ft. in length between the fore and aft cabin bulkheads, it will be constructed for rowing, single-handed sailing, cooking, and sleeping (designed tarp cover).  The single rowing station is a removable and movable thwart supported by seats along the starboard and port sides and secured with simple belaying pins.  There will be fixed stern and bow seats/thwarts just outside each cabin bulkhead lower than the bottom of watertight hatches.  The bow seat will house and support one (centered) or two (on each side) daggerboard trunks.  Oar locks or thole pins would be located in two positions — amidships for solitary rowing or when three persons are aboard and forward when two persons are aboard. Removable cockpit cowlings with rowing and bilge-pump scuppers may be designed for big-water expeditions.  The cowlings, designed to keep green water and spray out of the cockpit would bolt to the outside of the cowling portions of the aft edges of the forecabin and the fore edges of the aft cabin.  Aft of the bow thwart would be room for a future, open-air, portable head.

Watertight hatches — I need to research the construction of these two hatches that will be built into each of the bulkheads.  I envision that these hatches will be constructed of the material carefully cut from the bulkheads, that they will be seated on wood framing on the bulkheads on which I will have attached a weather sealing material; that they will be removable for storage in the cabins; and that they will be dogged down (with external hardware) along all four edges when in place.  Each hatch would have to be reinforced with dimensional lumber or additional plywood for support.

Sailing rig — The sailing rig is designed around the configuration of the sails I now own.  It would be a single-handed sailing rig all managed from the cockpit.  An existing mast may be employed, but fore and side stays would be added, if the step were to be a hinged affair atop the forecabin.  Location of the side-stay bases is an issue!  If the mast step were constructed just abaft the forward bulkhead perhaps side stays would be unnecessary — another issue!  The main sheet would be hauled from the aft cabin roof, and the jib sheets from fair leads whose locations have yet to be determined.

Steerage — The rudder would be constructed for beaching to run no deeper than the keel.  It would be controlled w/ rope fastened to an inboard tiller arm.

Transom — I plan a standard dory’s keystone-shaped transom — likely of oak.

Anchor Davit — Think about a fixed anchor davit at the bow.  I already own one…

Running Light(s) — White astern (perhaps mounted to telescope through the cabin overhang).  Bow or masthead lights — don’t think they would be required for a boat of this size.  How powered? – for now, flashlight batteries w/ existing stern light or the ship’s oil lamp I have on the sun porch.  The latter could hang from the fixed boom or lowered mast and would not be used under way.

 CONCEPT SHEET AND DESCRIPTION No. 2 – 13-FOOT, SELF-RIGHTING, EXPEDITION DORY (Second Cut)

 Roy Heberger

 January 2003

 This builds on Concept Sheet and Description No. 1 by expanding the LOA from 11 to 13 ft.  I am further developing a summary of my thoughts about a small boat that I could use to explore the fresh waters and protected salt waters of the United States.  This is still a Spartan, towable, beachable camping craft that I am envisioning.  Only a designed tarp would separate me from the elements as I sleep aboard at night.  During the day I could fashion shade.  Only my gear and supplies would be kept in dry stowage in cabins built forward and aft of an open cockpit.  So, here are my thoughts.  Oh, the boat would be capable of floating three people for day use.

GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The LOA is about 13 ft.; built with a multi-chine (2) Swampscott-type hull for rowing and sailing; beam greater than 5 ft.; self righting design with fore and aft dry stowage cabins.  For general use, boat camping, and extended expeditions on fresh water.

FEATURES

Hull — Plywood planking (two, 1/4th-inch minimum planks per side and one, 1/2-inch minimum “plywood-planked” bottom) with four chine logs running through notched, oak station frames (number yet to be determined) and two, 1/2-inch, water-tight, plywood and oak-framed, notched bulkheads (see below).  All seams to be filleted with epoxy/wood-flour mixture.  Two parallel runners and a centered keel will be fastened to its outside bottom.  The keel will run from stem to transom, and the runners will be shorter.  On the inside of the bottom between the station frames and bulkheads additional, 1/4-inch plywood planking will be fastened for support above each of the runners and the keel.  External fiberglass?  Coat (brushwork) all wood with several applications of lacquer-thinned epoxy, but check for compatibility of epoxy and fiberglass resins first.  Be certain to coat the inner hull and inner cabin materials beforecabin construction!  Finish with paint inside and out.  Trim (gunwales, Y-support, cabin overhang trim, thwarts, etc.) will receive a bright finish.

Cabins — To minimize mass above the gunwales, plywood (1/4th inch) will be used in construction of the fore and aft dry-stowage cabins.  The forecabin measures about 3 ft.  along roof between the forward, watertight bulkhead and top of stem, and the aft cabin measures about 2 ft. along roofline between the aft, watertight bulkhead and top of transom.  The bulkheads would be constructed of 1/2-inch plywood and supported by station frames.  Each cabin roof overhangs the cockpit by about 6 inches.  The edges of the overhanging cabins will be framed with dimensional lumber and/or plywood.  Consider multi-level stowage in the forecabin.

Fore-cabin supports for the mast step (just aft of the forward bulkhead) will be of dimensional lumber that runs forward to stem and abeam to the cabin sides where they will join (using gussets) ribs that run to the gunwales, chines, and bottom.  For tailoring a Y-fork will be inserted to carry the mast.  Aft cabin supports for a vertically adjustable Y-fork (to hold boom at sea and mast when it is down) will be of dimensional lumber.

All seams to be filleted with epoxy/wood-flour mixture.  The roof of the forecabin will be fitted with the green, light prism Merine gave to me.  The aft cabin will be dark.

Cockpit — Here expanded to eight ft. in length between the fore and aft cabin bulkheads, it will be constructed for rowing, single-handed sailing, cooking, and sleeping (designed tarp cover).  Sleeping length will be six-and-one-half ft.  The single rowing station is a removable and movable thwart supported by seats along the starboard and port sides (that run the full length of the cockpit) and secured with simple belaying pins.  There will be fixed stern and bow seats/thwarts just outside each cabin bulkhead lower than the bottom of watertight hatches.  The considerable bow seat will house and support the entire, centered daggerboard trunk just abaft the mast hole.

Oar locks or thole pins would be located in two positions — amidships for solitary rowing or when three persons are aboard and forward when two persons are aboard. Removable, canvas cockpit cowlings with rowing and bilge-pump scuppers may be designed for big-water expeditions.  The cowlings, designed to keep green water and spray out of the cockpit would fasten to the outside of the cowling portions of the aft edges of the forecabin and the fore edges of the aft cabin, along “open chines” between the cabins, and along the gunwales.

The open chines mentioned should be considered further.  They (two) would be part of a continuous chine log from stem to transom beefed up where they run in the air between the cabins.  These could be very useful for hanging and spreading the weather canvas from the boom or lowered mast.  They would make docking, boarding, and fishing a bit more difficult I suppose, but may well be worth the trouble in terms of their function.  Also, they would add considerably to stiffening the boat from stem to stern.

Aft of the bow thwart would be room for a future, small, self-contained, open-air, portable head.  It would have to be lifted to the forward thwart for sleeping.

Watertight hatches — I need to research the construction of these two or three hatches that will be built into each of the bulkheads.  I envision that these hatches (one aft and one or two forward) will be constructed of the material carefully cut from the bulkheads, that they will be seated on wood framing on the bulkheads on which I will have attached a weather sealing material; that they will be removable for storage in the cabins; and that they will be dogged down (with external hardware) along all four edges when in place.  Each hatch would have to be reinforced with dimensional lumber or additional plywood for support.  Note: if only one hatch is used in the forward bulkhead, clearance is needed between it and the mast.

Sailing rig — The sailing rig is designed around the configuration of the sails I now own.  It would be a single-handed sailing rig all managed from the cockpit.  An existing mast may be employed, but fore and side stays would be added, if the step were to be a hinged affair atop the forecabin.  Location of the side-stay bases is an issue!  If the mast step were constructed just abaft the forward bulkhead side stays would be unnecessary, and I’m leaning that direction presently.  However, it means constructing a new, longer mast with a diameter similar to that of the solo dory.  The main sheet would be hauled from the aft cabin roof, and the jib sheets from fair leads whose locations have yet to be determined.  If the flying chine logs are incorporated, perhaps they would provide a suitable location for the fair leads used to guide the jib sheets.

Steerage — The rudder would be constructed for beaching to run no deeper than the keel.  It would be controlled w/ rope fastened to an inboard tiller arm — likely fastened to the fixed stern thwart.

Transom — I plan a standard dory’s keystone-shaped transom — likely of oak.

Anchor Davit — Think about a fixed anchor davit at the bow.  I already own one…

Running Light(s) — White astern (perhaps mounted to telescope through the cabin overhang).  Bow or masthead lights — don’t think they would be required for a boat of this size.  How powered? — for now, flashlight batteries w/ existing stern light or the ship’s oil lamp I have on the sun porch.  The latter could hang from the fixed boom or lowered mast and would not be used under way.

Floatation — This is an added feature over the previous concept and includes floatation under the side seats.  It would not have to be foam — perhaps just some well-secured fenders.

APPENDIX 2 – SONGS

 

APPENDIX 3 – “TO-DOs” LISTS

Along the way I would have to stop and think about things that needed dong and the order in which to do them.  Here are examples.

LOOKING AHEAD – TURNING THE BOAT OVER — August 23, 2004

I’ve just applied the last coat of Interlux Barrier-Kote to the outside of the hull.  That makes for five coats on the bottom, three on the garboard and three on the sheerboard.  An added layer was applied by brush to the keel board, runners, false stem, bottom chine, the bottom of the transom, and the corner where the side planks meet the transom.  I had read on the Interlux website that it was a good idea to do that in such locations where wear would be greater.

I will soon be applying the finish coats of paint to the bottom and garboard before I turn the boat over to begin work inside.  So, now is the time to think about first-things-first once the boat is up right.

“Carpentry,” I’ll be doing a lot of that again, and it is not designed.  So, I’d best get my thoughts in order.  “Liquid joinery,” I’ll be doing that too.

Turning the BoatReinforce the broken cross spall at station two before doing anything!

Procedure –

  1. Suspend the transom.  May have to move the solo dory to do so.
  2. Get help.
  3. Lift from bow and sides.
  4. Place carpet remnants on the strong back.  So have them ready.
  5. Turn the boat slowly, not allowing the ribs to take any weight and not                                       allowing the chines to bump (no fillets yet).
  6. Set it down gently.
  7. Beers all round.

Next Construction Steps

Fillets –

  1. Fill at the joints between where the side planks meet the transom and                             where they meet the stem.  Any carpentry needed there?
  2. Make large fillets inside at the chines.  Note: Take care not to block the limbers at         stations 3 and 4.
  3. Make small fillets at the futtocks and ribs (except aft of station 5 and                            forward of station 2) where they touch the bottom and planks, respectively.
  4. Make small fillets at the knees and bottom.
  5. Coat all fillets w/ epoxy after the set up but before they are hard.
  6. Fiberglass tape over fillets at the chines

Inside Coats of Epoxy –

  1. Cover all of the planking, bottom, and ribs with several coats of epoxy.

Mark and cut Sheer –

  1. Bend large fairing baton to the sheer, and fasten with C-clamps. Mark sheer and cut    with jig saw, except at ribs.  Sand smooth.  Do not add outwale until cabins and decking            are finished with fiber glass at the sheer.***

Knight’s Heads – Marine plywood from scrap.

Inwales – Screw and glue approach.  Purchased a 1” X 6” X 18’ hemlock plank (09/02/04).  This structural component will never see water unless the boat capsizes or fills.

Attach forward ends to the Knights Heads.

Questions –

  1. Kind of wood:  Will that clear western larch work?
  2. Dimensions:  Get lengths needed from measurement inside.
  3. Will inwale be at same elevation as outwale or above?  It would help                             with drainage if there is a slope to outboard.  Would a slope have an effect on                            rowing?

 Rowing Supports –

  1. Fill with BC between inwale and top of sheerboard where the four oarlocks      will be             located.  See below for thoughts on locations.
  2. Where exactly will the oarlocks be located for two rowing positions?
  3. Purchase drill bit for drilling oarlock holes.  Consider the length of the oarlock shafts in            relation to the thickness of the oarlock pads.  Need to be able to secure the oarlocks from       below with thru-pins.
  4. Plugs (corks?) for empty oarlock pads to keep water out.

Breast Hook –

  1. Construct so as not to interfere with the cabin sides and top!  I may have the     white   oak necessary for the breast hook.  Go back and review the books.

Knees at transom and inwales –

  1. Construct so as not to interfere with cabin sides and top.  There may be enough white oak.

Knees at cabins –

  1. Consider adding knees inside the cabins at the inwales.

Finish frames –

  1. Add ribs at Station 1 (screw and glue).
  2. Cut out and chisel 1” X groves for additional roof support log in the roof spalls for Stations 1 and 2.
  3. Add cabin roof spalls at Stations 1 and 2.
  4. Add longitudinal support beams.
  5. Attach additional spalls to overhang for oar and tarp supports aft face of Station 2 cabin roof spall and forward face of station 5 cabin roof spall.
  6. Similarly, add short spalls for oar supports for when the oars are in the oarlocks. Need             to look at aft cabin side clearance to determine where these supports should be placed.          Would a second set of oar locks accomplish this more simply?

Inside of cabins considerations – Think in terms of securing the load.

  1. Shelving (attached to planking) and book and chart brackets on back side of     bulkheads?
  2. Tie downs?  Could be as simple as holes drilled in the ribs at station 1.
  3. Vertical partitions?
  4. White paint, but not to gluing edges.

Bulkhead – Sequence?

  1. Must be able to fit the bulkheads in so any partitions or shelves can not be in                 the way.
  2. Need to cut the hatches out before attaching the bulkheads, so some very specific         measurements will be necessary – especially to accommodate the mast now planed to   step in the cockpit just forward of station 3.
  3. Fillets needed to seal the bulkheads.

 Cabin Sides – Screw and glue.

  1. Shape –
  2. Aft edge of forecabin (support to Station 3 ribs).
  3. Forward edge of aft cabin (fore corner to sheerboard and overhang to                                       inwale for support.)  Perhaps combing and this indented side should be the same                           piece of plywood.
  4. Fillets (ribs) inside and epoxy and paint (not to gluing edges) coats inside and   out       before top goes on.
  5. Fiberglass tape at outside of cabin sides and sheer.  Fillet inside and tape?
  6. Additional support at stem for cabin sheathing.
  7. Additional support at transom for cabin sheathing.
  8. Perhaps rethink where cabins end at each end of boat or at least at the bow.  Ideas may            be to drop from the roof line at an angle to form a small deck at the stem. (???)

 Cabin Tops – Screw and glue.

  1. Epoxy coats inside and out before attachment.
  2. Fillets to roof supports after attachment at least toward the hatch where you can see     and reach.
  3. Inside fillets.
  4. Fiberglass tape at cabin tops and sides outside and inside where you can reach.
  5. Fiberglass cloth to all of outside of cabins.
  6. Inner support for an anchoring chock at forecabin top.

Concept:  build a breast hook on both sides of the longitudinal beam at the roof.  This       would spread the tension.

  1. Add BC edgings all exposed edges of cabin overhangs.

Side Decking and Coamings –

  1. Dimensions of decking (how wide)?  How wide will the cockpit be?
  2. Thickness – need strength here.
  3. Fiberglass tape and cloth (or two tapes?) to make tight at sheer line and to retard          abrasion at top of combing.  How much tape do I have?
  4. Then add a thin, BC edging on to the top of the combing.

 Cockpit –

  1. Mast step just forward of station 3 futtock.  Must get precise measurements for            alignment – step/thwart hole/cabin top hole (all rectangular); and for hatch-        opening           tolerance.
  2. Dagger-board trunk – Top of trunk must be recessed into thwart to accommodate         thickness of dagger-board lid and plug lid so they are flush with top of thwart.  Need finger     holes or rope to remove each.  Use 12 mm plywood?  Screw and glue.  See books!
  3. Thwarts – Materials?
  4. Side thwarts – Permanent – along each side below the coamings.                                               Include inner, recessed supports along inner edge of side thwarts for the                                        removable/stowable thwarts.
  5. There must be solid rowing thwarts that are permanent and lend                                     support side to side.  One may be the thwart where the dagger board and                                       mast step reside (forward rowing position for passenger or heavy aft                                       cargo situations).  The other will need to be located more amidships for                                               no passenger/no aft cargo situations).  At each location there must be                                                 sufficient room for and aft to accommodate rowing motion.
  6. Aft thwart permanent.
  7. Removable filler thwarts that store – perhaps just aft of the forward                                          bulkhead if there is room there of the hatch to operate with them stored.

Tiller –

  1. Thinking top of aft cabin now – a tiller with two side tiller extensions (or see below      at rudder description), as I like to stand when I sail and I think that it would not be too high            even when sitting.  The two control lines would be directly fastened between tiller and        rudder extensions without the need for any turns…or solid rudder/tiller connection          between rudder extension arm and tiller extension arm.

 Rudder –

  1. Standard pintle/gudgeon attachment of rudder.
  2. Two lateral tiller extensions for rope ties to tiller, or w/ a solid arm to join one    side      rudder extension to one side tiller extension.  Think about the solid arm approach more!
  3. Think about a rudder shape like a catboat.  Can always trim it down from there.

Boom/Mast Support –

  1. Need a boom support on top of aft cabin, so need to add support inside cabin   roof.    Need boom-length measurements (pull out main sail).  Must be high enough for head    room.
  2. Need to construct a forward mast support to ride in the mast step.  It must store           onboard and be long enough to keep mast above head in sitting position.

Cabin Side Supports –

  1. These would be simple BC hooks or holes for supporting the tarps.  BC with     holes    may be the better way to go as they would stay in place better.

Post-Construction Considerations

Hardware – (most of this I already have)

  1. Bow and stern lines (pad eyes v. holes in stem and transom).
  2. Fenders (4 cleats v. holes in combing).
  3. Tarp and cover.
  4. Jib sheet fairleads and cam cleats.
  5. Mainsheet hardware location?  See rigging considerations below.
  6. Jib halyard block at masthead
  7. Main halyard block at masthead.
  8. Boom/mast connection.
  9. Main sheet cleat location (see Rigging below).
  10. Jib block and cleat.
  11. Pennant block and cleat.
  12. Forestay (pad eye on stem?).
  13. Aft Stay (pad eye on transom?).
  14. Anchoring chock at bow.

 Rigging Considerations – (I have the sails.)

  1. New v. existing forestay (wire rope)?  This is a dimension question.
  2. New aft stay (rope).
  3. Control jib sheets w/ fairleads if necessary on the cabin sides and with the         cam cleats at the coamings (inside).
  4. Control of the mainsheet needs some thinking. I want to avoid having the         rotating cleat in the cockpit. So that may mean building a support on the aft cabin          above the tiller (like a traveler).

Lighting –

  1. Mooring light.
  2. Running light.
  3. Cockpit oil lamp from boom or under cabin roof overhang.
  4. Spot light (charged).
  5. Flash lights.

Cooking –

  1. MSR or Colman Sport Stove (white gas) w/ deep fire pan & trivet.
  2. Fire Extinguisher!

Sleeping –

  1. Cockpit cover (next year) to depend from boom, allows for stepped mast [sock             and side zipper w/ overlap storm flap from mast to combing (which side?)], and           fastens to outside of coamings and the sides and tops of the fore and aft cabins.

Include some protected vents w/ mosquito mesh (each end, perhaps) using ties to the fore and aft stays.  Also.  Have it depend from the boom to the combing over a            lateral support             between the cabins on each side of the boat to achieve a hip-roof     kind of tent.

Trailering –

  1. Boat cover (next year) w/ socks for the mast supports w/ full coverage to the     bottom of the boat.

Towing the boat behind another boat –

  1. Think about this and do some reading. Need to be able to suspend a tow line    around the entire boat…

THOUGHTS…– February 1, 2005

Looking ahead again, so I thought I’d document it here.

Thwarts – If I remove the seat risers in one piece (side deck supports have to come off to do that, but I have to take them off anyway to bevel-cut them to the proper 6-inch lengths), I can simply lay the riser set down on top of the 12-mm Okume (which I have decided to use for the thwarts) and trace the shape of the seats.  In that way the seats could actually be one piece, except for the cockpit boards which will be removable in the midsection and just aft of the bulkhead at the forecabin.

Inside Coatings – Paint v. epoxy and varnish?  I will paint the inside of the boat in the cockpit and varnish the inside of the boat in the cabins and on all the frames in the cabins and cockpit.  I will also epoxy coat the bulkheads and varnish them as well.  I will have to avoid painting where I will be using epoxy for the side decking, coamings, and cabin sides and top. I may paint the deck boards.  As a practical matter the paint is much more durable than the varnish.  So, what would get a bright finish?  The transom, mast, boom, grab rails (?) on each side of the cabin tops, outwales, beams (between the cabins on each side of the boat), bulkheads, and coamings all could be bright finished.  Perhaps the side decking could receive a bright finish as well.  Decisions, decisions…

The Tiller – A thought occurred to me and I made a sketch of it.  The rudder would have side tiller extensions (a tee) for rope.  The rope would run from one tiller extension forward along the side of or over the rear cabin, through a sheave in the leading edge of the cabin side near to the top, across the front of the cabin above the hatch, through another sheave, and back to the opposite tiller extension.  The control could be another tiller installed vertically from the rear seat riser to where the rope runs across the cabin front, or it could be a small wheel (should have bought that one in Bath, Maine).

Bulkhead and Forward Hatch – I’ve decided to leave the forecabin open to better house the oars.  I will need to decide the size and shape of the opening I will cut in the forward bulkhead.  The opening would be framed with RBC.  In use I will have a canvas cover that fastens securely over the opening to keep out rain.

Bulkhead and Aft Hatch(s) – It’s down to this set of options:

  1. One, long hatch with hinges at the top or bottom (?). It would have a height of approximately 18 inches and a width of about 36-38 inches if center;
  2. Two, 18-inch, square hatches with hinges near the cabin side. There would be a central vertical frame for support which could for the base of the rear mast and boom support for when the boat is on its trailer; or
  3. One, off-center, 18-inch, square hatch to one side or the other with hinges near the cabin side or the centerline of the bulkhead. A central support would be built in this option as well.

For all options the hatches themselves would be constructed of two pieces of 6-mm Okume.  The inside of the openings would be framed w/ RBC.  Need to look closely at the hinge and hasp construction and operation before framing decisions are made.***

MORE THOUGHTS – February 10, 2004

Forecabin –In the middle of the night I got to thinking about mast support and the form and function of extending the forecabin’s sides and top back to station 3.  Since I was awake, I got up, put on my sweats, and went out into the garage to look at the boat.  Looking at the boat, I determined that extending the forecabin aft would actually look better than the original design.  The partial bulkhead would remain at station 2 as planed.  I needed the cockpit length of 6 ft. to sleep aboard, so the bulkhead would remain just forward of station 2.  Given that the lofting board has returned to the garage floor I thought it would not be difficult to use it to develop lines for the ribs and cabin support beam at station 3.

So, in the light of day I reviewed my thinking from the middle of the night and decided to make the changes in the plans.  I developed the new lines, pulled out some RBC, cut it to size, sanded the varnish off, and made the new portion of frame 3 – cabin ribs and a beam.  I had thought about rowing motion and my tendency to lean way back on the pull.  So I decided to fasten the cabin ribs forward of the sheerboard ribs at station 3.  I bought ¾ inch by doing that.  Also, I will beef up the design by adding additional RBC support on the new ribs and beam in anticipation of having the cabin top be the support for the mast.

The newly assembled ribs and beam are screwed and glued to the boat and being held fast with C-clamps.

Looking to the inside of the boat

I removed the seat risers in anticipation of sanding, cleaning, preparation, and painting of the inside of the boat.  With the exception of the diagonal braces between stations 2 and 3, removal was quite easy.  I’m rethinking those braces.  Otherwise, the seat risers came out as a unit.  I will use it as a template to make the thwarts as one piece.

BOAT TO-DO’S IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER – March 30, 2005

Note:

Recheck the chronological order of this list for the “chrono” and the “logic” parts to really make sure it makes sense.  It’s very important, as it can mean the difference between having to do it “the easy way” or “the hard way” on some processes.

Other Stuff:

Start looking for trailer

Mud flaps for Jeep

Estimates from drawings of boat cover, tent, and bra (mast?)

Hardware:

Drill stem hole for bow eye bolt

Re-drill larger hole inside for bow eye washers and nuts

Install bow eye with bedding/cotton

Drill holes for gudgeons

Bolt gudgeons using bedding/cotton

Hold on pad-eyes bow and stern for stays

Think about tie downs at stern or depending on trailer

Stay plates (see rub rails)

Cabin Sides:

Fit cabin-side planks, both sides, fore and aft

Do not install cabin-side planks

Epoxy-coat the insides & edges

Set aside

Seat Riser Supports:

Measure for and install seat-riser support blocks (epoxy) at stations 2 and 5

Cockpit:

Sand futtocks, garboard (not sheerboard) ribs, and bulkheads in cockpit

Sand outside of bulkheads

Vacuum inside of boat

Wash inside of boat with solvent

Wash inside of boat with dilute soapy water

Rinse inside of boat and check for beading

If beading, dry and repeat washing process

Dry inside of boat

Varnish futtocks, garboard (not sheerboard) ribs, and bulkheads in cockpit

Varnish outside of bulkheads leaving room at sheer for gluing decking

Paint inside of bottom and sides (not to sheer) with base coat – 2 coats

Paint insides finish coat (not to sheer) – 2 coats

Hatch:

Sand and varnish outside of rear hatch cover

Install hatch cover on rear bulkhead

Mark inside of rear hatch cover at opening

Affix inner supports to rear hatch cover (epoxy)

Varnish inside of rear hatch cover

Inside of Cabins:

Sand futtocks and ribs

Sand inside of bulkheads

Build bulkhead bookcase/chart case/shelving on inner, rear bulkhead

Varnish inside of cabins leaving room at sheer for gluing

Reinstall pre-made shelves in cabins

Side Decking:

Epoxy-coat the tops-only of side decks

Seat Risers:

Sand and epoxy-coat seat risers

Sand and varnish seat risers

Reinstall seat risers

Thwarts and Thwart Plugs:

Drill finger holes in aft thwart plug

Epoxy-coat the thwart plugs

Will aft plug remain one piece?

Add BC support to bottom of each plug (locations?)

Set aside the plugs

Fit thwarts, drill holes, and fasten lightly

Remove thwarts

Cup/Can holders?

Epoxy-coat the thwarts (both sides and edges) & let harden

Sand and varnish thwarts

Side Decking Supports:

Reinstall side-deck supports (epoxy)

Epoxy-coat all of sheer/side-deck supports except tops

Measure and reinstall deck/sheer supports (3-4 & 4-5)

Add support blocks (epoxy) to ribs below deck/sheer supports

Varnish reminder of inside of sheerboard under supports

Varnish underside of deck/sheer supports

Varnish sheer ribs

Rub Rail Preparations:

Fill (epoxy) and mark on top of sheer all holes for knees, breast hook, supports

Side-stay plates at station 3 starboard and port

Make and fasten outside of hull inside of rub rail

Measure and cut stem angle on rub rail-sized expendable stock

Be sure to allow for fit above the sheer, allowing for thickness of side decking

Check and recheck angles for fit

Measure and cut stem angles on actual rub rail stock

Avoid drilling holes at the marks on top of the sheer (wood already screws there)

Fit rub rail over stay plates (cut and chisel)

Install rub rails at proper height (= 1/16’ above top of side decks = 1/16” + 24mm)

Side Decking:

Install side decks (epoxy)

Epoxy filler at stations 2, 3, & 5 on side decks and along rub rail

Coamings:

Fit and install coamings (epoxy, clamp, and screw)

Epoxy-coat the coamings, filling all screw holes

Glass tape the coamings – especially the tops

Sand and varnish coamings

Think about safe stove support over side  ||____

Cabins:

Add side and center cabin-top supports?

If so, fit and install level with beam tops (fair curves!)

Refit and install cabin sides fore and aft (epoxy, clamp, and screw)

Epoxy fillets at sheer inside and out

Fill screw holes

Glass tape at sheer/cabin sides inside

Think about inside of cabins for finishing touches (now or never)

Measurn tops fore and aft

Epoxy insides of tops except edges

Set aside

Do not install cabin tops yet

Mast & Boom:

Measure sails, consider head clearance, and make three-piece mast (epoxy)

Rectangular bottom portion to above cabin top

Make boom long enough for “tent”

Epoxy coat, sand, and varnish

How to transport with boat cover?

Construct mast/boom supports on cabin tops???

 Mast Step/Support:

Cut mast holes in cabin top

Frame the holes

Cut mast holes in mast step at keelson

Fasten mast step to keelson

Install mast supports to beams between stations 2 and 3

Epoxy cabin tops inside and out

Varnish inside of cabin sides and inside of cabin tops avoiding the joints

Think again about insides of cabins (really the very last chance)

Cabin Top:

Refit and install cabin tops (epoxy & screw)

Epoxy fillet at cabin tops and sides inside

Plain outside fillet into cabin sides/tops

Glass tape the cabin top/side seams inside and outside

Sand tape to smooth finish

Glass cloth the cabin tops and sides outside

More Painting & Varnishing:

Sand cabins outside

Sand inside filets near top

Solvent wash the cabins outside and inside at fillets

Detergent wash same

Rinse same

Paint base- (3) and finish-coats (2-3) on cabin outsides and side decks

Varnish the top glass fillets inside the cabins

Scantlings and More:

Side poles or lines for “tent”  /\

Make oar locks of BC                             | |

Epoxy and varnish the oarlocks

Oil the oarlock holes & keep oil on board

Attach oarlocks ¼” with stainless bolts (2-each)

Make oars

Make rudder & add pintles

Make tiller(s)

Build dagger board and DB trunk plug

Devise tiller/rope controls and install using fairleads/sheaves

Add padeyes – one each – to aft-side of stem and forward side of transom

Top of mast hardware: main, jib, toping lift for and aft stays

Middle of mast hardware: side stays

Above cabin top hardware: cleats for all lines (4:00, 6:00, & 8:00 positions – low)

Finish false-stem work

Trailer:

Prepare trailer

License same

Get help to move boat from strong back to trailer

Forward Thwart Plug Revisited:

Pull boat and trailer outside and step mast

Measure and cut forward thwart plug for the two mast positions

Epoxy forward-thwart plug & edges

Varnish forward-thwart plug & edges

Stays:

With mast still up…

Measure for forestay (long and for multi-mast positions 2 stays or 1 extendable)

Measure for side stays (short and multi-mast positions 4 stays or 2 extendable)

Measure for aft stay (multi-mast position 2 stays or 1 extendable)

Have stays made for both mast positions

Color code the stays by mast position and location as needed

Rig:

Need new lines?

Raise sails

Rig jib to raise and lower from cockpit

Fasten fairleads for jib

Consider rig for main

Topping lift for main

Also rig to fasten boom to aft stay

Boom-vang set up

 

APPENDIX 4 – A BOATLOAD OF AMBITION

An article from Woodenboat (No. 176, January/February 2004) is included in this appendix.  This article inspired the design I selected for this boat.

 

APPENDIX 5 – NOTES AND DRAWINGS

 

In my paper copy of this journal I have included in the pages that do not follow here a chronological record never digitized.  They begin in December of 2003 before the lines drawings I completed of this boat in early January of 2004.  They end with my botched estimate of costs in November of 2005.  Included are sketches of ideas, my detailed lines drawings and offsets from those drawings, the final offsets from the lofting board, and numerous other notes and sketches that all helped me to envision and build this boat.  It was an adventure.